Why study Undergraduate Medicine?

 

2015-10-19-clinical-skillsIf you enjoy helping people, Medicine is one of the most rewarding careers you can choose. As a doctor you will be involved in diagnosing and treating illness and providing advice and reassurance to your patients. It requires an enquiring mind, the capacity to acquire and maintain high levels of knowledge and the ability to relate to individuals each with their own health needs.

There is a wide range of career opportunities for doctors with over 60 different specialties available.

Further information: see NHS Medical Careers

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Unique advantages of the St Andrews Programme

BSc Hons and MB ChB/MBBS
Students entering Medicine at St Andrews have the unique opportunity to graduate after three years at St Andrews with a BSc Honours degree in Medicine before moving on to one of our Partner Medical Schools to complete their training as a doctor and graduate with an MB ChB/MBBS.

Top in ‘student satisfaction’ survey
The School of Medicine has been rated very highly in the UK ‘student satisfaction’ ratings, in top place for 2 of the last 3 years. This is judged on course quality, staff and teaching facilities.

Medicine housed in a £45m School of Medicine and the Sciences

Since 2010 the School of Medicine has been housed in a new £45m School of Medicine and the Sciences and is one of the first UK Medical Schools whose research facilities are fully integrated with the other sciences and key University disciplines including Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Psychology. This facility offers an important new dimension to medical research and the training of new doctors.
Housed in
£0m
building


A highly supportive educational environment
Around
400
in each year
The small size of the School (around 170 in each year group) allows staff to get to know students individually and this encourages a friendly atmosphere. You will be allocated a tutor who will be concerned with your personal welfare and academic development as we aim to provide a supportive environment in which you can thrive. Our advising system is highly regarded within the University.

Diverse range of students from all around the world
At St Andrews we welcome students from all around the world and in Medicine we value the diverse influences such students can bring to the cohort entering each year.

Formal partnerships with highly prestigious Medical Schools in Scotland, England and Canada

UCAS Code Numbers: A100 and A990

Student comments

Divya (Toronto, Canada)

comment_divya“St Andrews was the perfect university for me. The system-based approach of the curriculum, the detailed focus on aspects of disease and treatment and the clinical skills teaching thoroughly prepared me for my clinical years at Edinburgh. Especially noteworthy was the cadaveric dissection of the entire human body and the opportunity for research in the final year. There is a strong culture of mentoring and close academic supervision which is balanced by the encouragement towards self-directed learning. The new medical school is absolutely stunning and provides students with state-of-the-art facilities to complement their learning and experience. This extremely demanding course was both provoking and pleasing and has enabled me to fully realise my potential as a medical student and as a future doctor.”


Deepika (Toronto, Canada)

comment_deepika“I am honoured to be a medical graduate from St Andrews; this has made all the difference to my medical knowledge and competency and provided the necessary foundation for my clinical years at Edinburgh and my future as a young doctor in training. St Andrews graduates are a class apart and have the ability to create their own special niche, not only at partner clinical schools, but within the medical profession as a whole. Studying at St Andrews allowed me to interact with a vast array of students from all parts of the world, bringing people from all cultures together towards a common denominator: ‘world class medical education’.”


Marioria (Glasgow)

comment_Marioria“Having now completed my degree and moved on to Manchester, I now really appreciate the three-year St Andrews course. Not only are there teachers who are specialists in their field, but also experienced clinicians who know (in a way that a young student just cannot) what knowledge is important for a future doctor. This is reflected in the learning objectives we receive on each topic, helping us navigate a minefield of detail with steady assurance.”


Mary (Derry, Northern Ireland)

comment_Mary“The medical course is well structured and is both interesting and challenging. In addition to a degree, I left having made a group of lifelong friends. The Medical Society is dynamic and very active, getting you involved from day one and ensuring that your three years are unforgettable. St Andrews is a really beautiful and unique place to live and study in, what other medical school is surrounded by so much history right beside the sea?!”


David (Hong Kong)

comment_David“The student life at St Andrews was a truly colourful and enjoyable experience. St Andrews provides a great platform to build up a solid pre-clinical knowledge with dissecting experience and early skills training which not many medical schools provide. It shapes St Andrews medics into a well-prepared group for the more challenging clinical years. Here, you can make friends with staff and teachers who are willing to help at all times.”


Daniel (Wigan, Lancs.)

comment_Daniel“I really enjoyed my time in St Andrews. The system-based approach to teaching was very logical and allowed a combination of traditional and new teaching methods to be incorporated. The Medical School, being smaller than most others, allows this accessibility and personal teaching that otherwise may not be possible … The town’s social scene is also excellent. The lack of night clubs is more than made up with by the many pubs, bars, and numerous societies and sports clubs.”


Neil (Stranraer, Wigtownshire)

comment_Neil“The School offers you world-class teaching from some of the most inspirational and passionate characters you will ever meet. For a ‘pre-clinical’ course, there is a surprising amount of excellent clinical skills teaching – this gives you the chance to practise your skills in a ‘safe’ environment and indeed I appreciate having been given this opportunity before starting on the wards.”

 

 

BSc (Honours) Medicine Course Details

A100

BSc (Hons) Medicine (3 years) at St Andrews leading to MB ChB/MBBS (3 years) at Partner Medical School (Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Manchester or Barts)

A990

BSc (Hons) Medicine (3 years) at St Andrews leading to MB ChB (3 years) at Edinburgh Medical School (for Canadian applicants only). Following graduation, students will enter Residency training programmes in Canada.
• See also: Additional details for A990

All entrants onto the Medical Course at St Andrews, whether they are on the A100 pathway or the A990 pathway, will follow exactly the same course whilst at St Andrews as detailed below.

Course Overview

All students studying Medicine at St Andrews, whether they are on the A100 pathway or the A990 pathway, will follow exactly the same programme at St Andrews. For those on the A100, the course is designed to prepare you, ultimately, for progression to the NHS two year Foundation Programme in the United Kingdom. The medical course has a long established reputation as providing an excellent scientific basis for clinical training and includes the opportunity to observe human structure directly by dissection of the entire body. Clinical training begins the day students enter the School of Medicine at St Andrews. Clinical knowledge, skills and professional behaviours, including all aspects of patient safety, are key components of our curriculum.

Year 1 Foundations of Medicine 1 and 2

The first year of the degree programme comprises two modules, Foundations of Medicine 1 and 2. The first semester module provides a broad overview of the structure, function and behaviour of cells, tissues, and systems within the human body. The second semester module uses the musculoskeletal system to provide the integrated theme which mirrors the framework of the modules taught in subsequent years. Year 1 modules cover introductory overviews of the clinical sciences including pathology, microbiology, health psychology, public health medicine and key aspects of medical ethics and law. You will discover the basics of medicine on an individual and population level.

It is not only vital to understand the scientific basis of health and disease, but also how to develop professional thinking, effective communication and problem solving skills. These are developed in case-based clinical scenarios and interviews with patients. Basic clinical skills are taught and these include basic life support, measuring and recording vital signs, clinical communication and patient safety.

Years 2 and 3 – Honours Programme

The Honours programme comprises a series of modules that revisit and build upon the knowledge base that was established in Foundations of Medicine 1 and 2. The normal and abnormal structure and function of each of the body systems (e.g. cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and neurological and endocrine) will be studied in depth and you will examine the scientific basis of important disease mechanisms and therapeutic treatment in each of the body systems.

During the Honours years a deeper understanding of clinical communication, medical ethics, professionalism, public health, health psychology and the practice of medicine is fostered. Critical thinking, reflective practice and decision-making skills are enhanced through the use of published literature and video presentations. There is ample opportunity to consolidate clinical skills and patient examination techniques and take your first steps in the diagnosis and management of patients.

Student-Selected Component – Honours Dissertation

The final semester of Year 3 has a strong emphasis on independent learning and includes the student-selected research dissertation. Students choose a laboratory research, data handling, medical education or critical review project in order to pursue an area of their own particular interest over a 10-12 week period.

Clinical Programme

Building on the frameworks developed in Year 1, Year 2 and semester 1 of Year 3 integrates the scientific systems-based approach with appropriate consultation skills. Students learn to take a history, perform examinations relating to each system and interpret results of investigations in order to further prepare students for patient contact. As an integral part of clinical training students use advanced video recording facilities to provide evidence of their competence in clinical examination.

Students not only have contact with simulated patients in the Medical School but also participate in regular primary care attachments in local hospitals. In Year 3, ward skills and practice of clinical and communication skills are developed in 10 sessions arranged in Fife teaching hospitals. These sessions ensure that students have the confidence to make best use of future clinical attachments when continuing at Partner Medical Schools. Hospital consultants are actively involved in teaching both in the Medical School and on placements.

During the summer vacation between 2nd and 3rd year, students may elect to consolidate their learning by spending a residential week in a wide range of primary or secondary clinical care placements.

Our aim is to ensure that by the time a student graduates from St Andrews they will have the knowledge, skills and experience to take a full patient history, to record their findings accurately and to be able to discuss further patient management in any clinical setting.

St-Andrews-Community-Hospital


University of Aberdeen School of Medicine and Dentistry

unilogoStudents from St Andrews can join Year 3 of Aberdeen MBChB and take advantage of a bridging course to help students integrate as well as the remote and rural option in Year 4 which offers placements in the Highlands and Islands in locations such as Fort William, Stornoway, Wick, Orkney and Shetland.
Click here to visit the University of Aberdeen’s pages on joining from St Andrews.




University of Dundee School of Medicine

uod_logo-rgbThe University of Dundee Medical School and Ninewells Teaching Hospital are fully integrated, offering an up-to-date and well-equipped clinical training facility very close to St Andrews. Join the MB ChB course in Year 3 to continue your studies in a small group teaching environment in a city close to St Andrews.
Click here to visit the University of Dundee’s pages on joining from St Andrews.




The University of Edinburgh School of Medicine and Veterinary Science

logoSt Andrews’ students can join Year 4 of the MBChB programme in Edinburgh.
Click here to visit the University of Edinburgh’s pages on joining from St Andrews.




University of Glasgow School of Medicine

University-of-GlasgowAs a Direct Entrant into Year 3 of the MBChB programme you will be joining one of the largest Undergraduate School in the United Kingdom that has a unique brand that reflects the exposure of medical undergraduates to research leaders and teachers in clinical and basic sciences.
Click here to visit the University of Glasgow’s pages on joining from St Andrews.




Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary, University of London

Unknown-1An exciting new Partnership with Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry allows up to 20 students to progress to Barts and the London to complete the final 3 years of their MBBS degree after graduating from St Andrews with a BSc (Honours) Medicine degree. This new Partnership is the result of previous informal links with Barts. This formal Partnership will operate in the same way as those with the Medical Schools at Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow and Manchester.

Information about campus choices and allocations can be found in the ‘Course Pathways’ section below.

Further information about the course at Barts




University of Manchester Medical School

92Manchester Medical School is part of the University of Manchester. The School trains highly-competent and well-rounded junior doctors, scholars and scientists; it is the largest medical school in the UK with around 2200 undergraduate students.

The five-year Medicine (MBChB) at Manchester is divided into three phases over five years:

  • phase one (years 1 and 2)
  • phase two (years 3 and 4)
  • phase three (year 5)

As a graduate of the BSc Hons Medical Science at St Andrews University on the Manchester pathway, you will join the Medicine (MBChB) at Manchester at the start of phase two (year 3). You will complete phases two and three (years 3 to 5) of the course.
Click here to visit the University of Manchester’s pages on joining from St Andrews.

Entrance Options
  • School Leaver
  • Graduate
  • Pathway to Medicine at Perth College
Course Pathways
  • A100 combined degree programme for UK/EU
  • Total duration 6 years
  • A100 = Phase 1 + Phase 2
    • Phase 1 = years 1-3: BSc Honours at University of St Andrews
    • Phase 2 = years 4-6: MB ChB at a UK Partner Medical School (MBBS at Barts)

A100: campus code S (Scotland)

52 places for ‘home’ applicants (Phase 2 at Aberdeen 10%, Dundee 10%, Edinburgh 30%, Glasgow 50%)

A100: campus code R (England)
50 places for ‘home’ applicants (Phase 2 at Manchester)
20 places for ‘home’ applicants (Phase 2 at Barts and the London)

A100: campus code N (No preference)
If you have no preference for where Phase 2 is undertaken, select ‘No Preference’ and you will allocated either England or Scotland.

Campus Choices

UK or EU students may apply for St Andrews/Scotland, St Andrews/England or St Andrews/No preference.

Your UCAS application should include only one application to the A100 course at St Andrews e.g. you cannot select both the Scotland route and the England route.

Allocation to Medical Schools

Allocation to Scottish Schools (Medical Schools at the Universities of Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow)
A100: S (Scotland) students will be asked to indicate their preferred Scottish location in December in the second year of the course. Academic performance in first semester of second year at St Andrews combined with student location preference, is used to allocate places. Prior to entry to the course at St Andrews, potential students should consider the different medical school options available for their final years of study. See the Partner Medical Schools section for more information.
Allocation to English Schools (Medical Schools at the Universities of Manchester and Queen Mary London (Barts))
A100: R (England) students will be asked to indicate their preferred English location in December in the second year of the course. Academic performance in first semester of second year combined with student location preference, is used to allocate to either Manchester or Barts. Prior to entry to the course at St Andrews, potential students should consider the different medical school options available for their final years of study. See the Partner Medical Schools section for more information. If allocated to Manchester, applicants should be aware that there is a further allocation to clinical training; this allocation will be a random allocation carried out in the second semester of second year at St Andrews.

After graduation

To progress to a partner medical school students must graduate with an Honours degree and be deemed as Fit to Practise. After graduating from one of our UK Partner Schools you will receive your MB ChB degree (MBBS from Barts), which is a primary medical qualification (PMQ). Holding a PMQ entitles you to provisional registration with the General Medical Council, subject only to its acceptance that there are no Fitness to Practise concerns that need consideration. Provisional registration is time limited to a maximum of three years and 30 days (1125 days in total). After this time period your provisional registration will normally expire.

Provisionally registered doctors can only practise in approved Foundation Year 1 posts: the law does not allow provisionally registered doctors to undertake any other type of work. To obtain a Foundation Year 1 post you will need to apply during the final year of your undergraduate course through the UK Foundation Programme Office selection scheme, which allocates these posts to graduates on a competitive basis. So far, all suitably qualified UK graduates have found a place on the Foundation Year 1 programme, but this cannot be guaranteed, for instance if there were to be an increased number of competitive applications.

Successful completion of the Foundation Year 1 programme is normally achieved within 12 months and is marked by the award of a Certificate of Experience. You will then be eligible to apply for full registration with the General Medical Council. You need full registration with a licence to practise for unsupervised medical practice in the NHS or private practice in the UK.

Although this information is currently correct, students need to be aware that regulations in this area may change from time to time.

There is some discussion about whether to remove provisional registration for newly qualified doctors. If this happens then UK graduates will receive full registration as soon as they have successfully completed an MB ChB (or equivalent) degree. It should be noted that it is very likely that UK graduates will still need to apply for a training programme similar to the current Foundation Programme and that places on this programme may not be guaranteed for every UK graduate.

The GMC is currently considering the introduction of a formal assessment that UK medical graduates would need to pass in order to be granted registration with a licence to practise. Although no final decision has been taken as to whether or when such an exam will be introduced applicants should be aware that the GMC envisages that future cohorts of medical students may need to pass parts of a medical licensing assessment before the GMC will grant them registration with a licence to practise.

PG Study in MSc Health Psychology is optional following Phase 1.

Entrance Options
  • School Leaver
  • Graduate
  • International Foundation for Medicine at St Andrews
Course Pathway
  • A100 combined degree programme for ‘Overseas’ students
  • Total duration 6 years
  • A100 = Phase 1 + Phase 2
    • Phase 1 = years 1-3: BSc Honours at University of St Andrews
    • Phase 2 = years 4-6: MB ChB at Manchester Medical School

A100: campus code R (England)
30 places for ‘overseas’ students (Phase 2 at Manchester)

Campus Choices

A100 applicants who are ‘Overseas’ for fee purposes must apply for St Andrews/England as entrants will complete Phase 2 in Manchester.

Your UCAS application should include only one application to the A100 course at St Andrews e.g. you cannot select both the Scotland route and the England route.

Allocation to for Phase 2 (Years 4-6)

Overseas students are allocated to Manchester at the time of offer. Applicants should be aware that those on the Manchester route are allocated to clinical training; this allocation will be random and carried out in the second semester of second year at St Andrews. See the Partner Medical Schools section for more information.

After graduation

To progress to a partner medical school students must graduate with an Honours degree and be deemed as Fit to Practise. After graduating from one of our UK Partner Schools you will receive your MB ChB degree, which is a primary medical qualification (PMQ). Holding a PMQ entitles you to provisional registration with the General Medical Council, subject only to its acceptance that there are no Fitness to Practise concerns that need consideration. Provisional registration is time limited to a maximum of three years and 30 days (1125 days in total). After this time period your provisional registration will normally expire.

Provisionally registered doctors can only practise in approved Foundation Year 1 posts: the law does not allow provisionally registered doctors to undertake any other type of work. To obtain a Foundation Year 1 post you will need to apply during the final year of your undergraduate course through the UK Foundation Programme Office selection scheme, which allocates these posts to graduates on a competitive basis. So far, all suitably qualified UK graduates have found a place on the Foundation Year 1 programme, but this cannot be guaranteed, for instance if there were to be an increased number of competitive applications.

Successful completion of the Foundation Year 1 programme is normally achieved within 12 months and is marked by the award of a Certificate of Experience. You will then be eligible to apply for full registration with the General Medical Council. You need full registration with a licence to practise for unsupervised medical practice in the NHS or private practice in the UK.

Although this information is currently correct, students need to be aware that regulations in this area may change from time to time.

There is some discussion about whether to remove provisional registration for newly qualified doctors. If this happens then UK graduates will receive full registration as soon as they have successfully completed an MB ChB (or equivalent) degree. It should be noted that it is very likely that UK graduates will still need to apply for a training programme similar to the current Foundation Programme and that places on this programme may not be guaranteed for every UK graduate.

The GMC is currently considering the introduction of a formal assessment that UK medical graduates would need to pass in order to be granted registration with a licence to practise. Although no final decision has been taken as to whether or when such an exam will be introduced applicants should be aware that the GMC envisages that future cohorts of medical students may need to pass parts of a medical licensing assessment before the GMC will grant them registration with a licence to practise.

PG Study in MSc Health Psychology is optional following Phase 1.

Entrance Options
  • School Leaver
  • Graduate
Course Pathway
    • A100 combined degree programme for ‘Overseas’ students
    • Total duration 6 years
    • A100 = Phase 1 + Phase 2
      • Phase 1 = years 1-3: BSc Honours at University of St Andrews
      • Phase 2 = years 4-6: MB ChB at Manchester Medical School

A100: campus code R (England)
30 places for ‘overseas’ students (Phase 2 at Manchester)


Note:
 Canadian applicants who are ‘Overseas’ for fee purposes can apply for either the A990 or A100 programme, not both.

Campus Choices

A100 applicants who are ‘Overseas’ for fee purposes must apply for St Andrews/England as entrants will complete Phase 2 in Manchester.

Your UCAS application should include only one application to the A100 course at St Andrews e.g. you cannot select both the Scotland route and the England route.

Allocation to for Phase 2 (Years 4-6)

Overseas students are allocated to Manchester at the time of offer. Applicants should be aware that those on the Manchester route are allocated to clinical training at; this allocation will be random and carried out in the second semester of second year at St Andrews. See the Partner Medical Schools section for more information.

After graduation

To progress to a partner medical school students must graduate with an Honours degree and be deemed as Fit to Practise. After graduating from one of our UK Partner Schools you will receive your MB ChB degree, which is a primary medical qualification (PMQ). Holding a PMQ entitles you to provisional registration with the General Medical Council, subject only to its acceptance that there are no Fitness to Practise concerns that need consideration. Provisional registration is time limited to a maximum of three years and 30 days (1125 days in total). After this time period your provisional registration will normally expire.

Provisionally registered doctors can only practise in approved Foundation Year 1 posts: the law does not allow provisionally registered doctors to undertake any other type of work. To obtain a Foundation Year 1 post you will need to apply during the final year of your undergraduate course through the UK Foundation Programme Office selection scheme, which allocates these posts to graduates on a competitive basis. So far, all suitably qualified UK graduates have found a place on the Foundation Year 1 programme, but this cannot be guaranteed, for instance if there were to be an increased number of competitive applications.

Successful completion of the Foundation Year 1 programme is normally achieved within 12 months and is marked by the award of a Certificate of Experience. You will then be eligible to apply for full registration with the General Medical Council. You need full registration with a licence to practise for unsupervised medical practice in the NHS or private practice in the UK.

Although this information is currently correct, students need to be aware that regulations in this area may change from time to time.

There is some discussion about whether to remove provisional registration for newly qualified doctors. If this happens then UK graduates will receive full registration as soon as they have successfully completed an MB ChB (or equivalent) degree. It should be noted that it is very likely that UK graduates will still need to apply for a training programme similar to the current Foundation Programme and that places on this programme may not be guaranteed for every UK graduate.

The GMC is currently considering the introduction of a formal assessment that UK medical graduates would need to pass in order to be granted registration with a licence to practise. Although no final decision has been taken as to whether or when such an exam will be introduced applicants should be aware that the GMC envisages that future cohorts of medical students may need to pass parts of a medical licensing assessment before the GMC will grant them registration with a licence to practise.

PG Study in MSc Health Psychology is optional following Phase 1.

Entrance Options
  • School Leaver
  • Graduate
Course Pathway

Note: Canadian applicants who are ‘Overseas’ for fee purposes can apply for either the A990 or A100 programme, not both.

PG Study in MSc Health Psychology is optional following Phase 1.